By Upsocl
diciembre 4, 2019

“Homosexuality isn’t a natural thing for Ugandan people, but there’s been a massive recruiting of homosexual people in schools, especially among the young, where the false idea of people being born like this is being promoted”, the Ministry of Ethics and Integrity declared.

The LGBTQ+ community, in the last few decades, has managed important achievements in terms of rights, recognition, and representation at the international level. But there are countries that seem to go the opposite route. In Uganda, for example, homosexuality has become a topic of debate again after the government announced that, in a few weeks, the bill that condemns homosexual people to the death penalty, will be introduced again, even after being annulled five years ago because of a technicality.

Uganda’s President | Shutterstock

The bill is known as “Kill the Gays”. As its name says, it has the mission of severely punishing those who “commit homosexual acts.” This is happening in a country known to have some of the most restrictive laws in the world regarding LGBTQ+ people, since in Uganda (as in other African countries), same-sex relationships are considered taboo and “gay sex” is a crime that merits punishments such as jail time.

“Homosexuality isn’t a natural thing for Ugandan people, but there’s been a massive recruiting of homosexual people in schools, especially among the young, where the false idea of people being born like this is being promoted (…) Our current laws are limited. They only criminalize the act. We want to make it clear that, any person involved in the promotion and recruitment needs to be punished. Those who commit grave acts will be punished with the death penalty.”

Simon Lokodo, Ministry of Ethics and Integrity, according to the Daily Mail.

Ministry of Ethics and Integrity| Shutterstock

This is happening after, at the beginning of this year, Brunei provoked international outrage after legalizing the death penalty as a punishment for gay sex, which forced the government to back down after criticism and an international boycott. Meanwhile, the Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni, feels calm at knowing that he counts with the support of the Ugandan parliament.

“Introducing this bill against homosexual people again will only fuel discrimination and violence.”

Zahara Mohamed, from the Toronto-based Stephen Lewis charity organization, who strongly opposes this lethal bill.

Wikimedia

The bill will be introduced in the following weeks and the voting will take place at the end of the year. Lokodo has said they’re prepared for any sort of negative reaction, already having experience with it since, in 2014, they also approved this bill and multiple countries suspended or redirected the humanitarian aid they used to provide for Uganda. The bill is keeping the Ugandan LGBTQ+ community in high alert since they’re mourning the murders of three gay men and a trans woman this year.

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